3-1-1 Liquids Bans

Shipping Wine? Think Again!

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Liquids, Shipping Wine, Travel, TSA Regulations on April 21st, 2021 by – 16 Comments

Heard the rumors lately? I’ve been hearing through the grape vine (no pun intended!) various concerns about wine transportation in air travel. These are mostly due to the new regulations of various airlines and the TSA (Transportation Security Administration).  These regulations can lead to hassles and delays for both leisure and business travelers.  Some organizations need specialty wine at conferences for whatever reason and need wine shipped to these conference locations. So these businesses have to create an entire plan just to ship wine! Below are a few points that may be helpful if you’re caught in this situation:

What is your state law?
There are three major categories that any wine lover should consider before shipping wine to or from their travel location.  Make sure you are aware of your state’s law before you book your next wine trip or plan to send a wine gift.

1. Reciprocal states: Reciprocity requires the legislative cooperation of other states to recognize a two-way shipment privilege.  This means that only wineries in another reciprocal state can ship into the reciprocal states: Iowa and New Mexico.

2. States wine can be shipped to on a limited basis: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington D.C., West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming

3. States where wine shipping from direct to consumer is prohibited: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Utah

So with all of these restrictions and hassles, would a consumer still want to ship wine?  The TSA regulations do not allow travelers to carry wine or liquor on board these days, so you need to be able to safely pack these liquids in your checked luggage.  Socks and dirty clothes may have done the job in the past, but TSA can still confiscate your valuable liquids if they are not properly packed.  To ease the burden of TSA inspecting your luggage or worrying about shipping wine to your home state, what you need is a wine travel case! BottleWise Duo – The Ultimate Multipurpose Wine Travel System is your perfect solution to your wine travel needs by eliminating wine shipping hassles. It’s much more economical since it is a onetime investment for long-term enjoyment. Benefits of having a wine travel case like BottleWise Duo is that you have your favorite wine with you whenever you travel, and you don’t have to worry about state regulations for wine shipping. Free the grapes by giving your vino the freedom to travel safely and comfortably in the BottleWise Duo wine travel case!

BottleWise is committed to manufacturing high-quality bags that make life easier for the discriminating culinary traveler and is founded by Amy Dias  – adias@bottlewise.com.

TSA Regulations and Travel Precautions

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Liquids, Travel, TSA Regulations, TSA Restricted Items on July 15th, 2013 by – Be the first to comment

The subject of travel brings so much to mind: planning for the place, booking tickets, booking hotel rooms, exotic getaways, safaris, cruises, backpacking, sight-seeing and so on. When all the planning and packing is done, we’re almost set to go. Expect, there is always the tension of passing through airport security; that always brings mixed feelings of frustration, fear and worries for most of us. One of the things that bring on these mixed feelings is the tiresome TSA
(Transportation Security Administration) regulations. Some of us don’t even know what a TSA regulation is, yet we go through the process every time we travel on an airplane! Below are some pre-travel arrangements to save time and relieve you from some frustrations of travel.

TSA and its regulations:

TSA – Transportation Security Administration handles activities connected with Travel and
Commerce. The TSA uses an easy 3-1-1 formula for passengers to remember.
3 – Passenger may only carry 3 oz. or smaller containers of liquid or gel.
1 – Their containers should be in a one-quart size, clear, plastic, zip-top bag.
1 – Only one bag per traveler can be placed in the security bin.

People don’t like to travel as much these days for some specific reasons.  Here are some funny tweets as to the reason why:

“New TSA regulation requires passengers must hold breath for the final hour of flight while
humming ‘Kumbaya.’”

” I sure hope these travel regulations don’t hold up my wire transfer from Nigeria.”

Some of the frequent concerns people have about security screening before reaching their gate:

  • I have to practically undress to go through security: strip my socks, shoes and belt
  • I need to go for a week but I’m only packing tiny vials of shampoo, lotion to last a day!
  • I always have to unzip my bag, lug out my laptop and turn it on for security.
  • I hate going through security with my kids; they’re confused, hungry, tired and running all over the place and then I forget to take of my shoes!

So there’s obviously frustration out there. However, we have to realize that the TSA was formed after September 11, 2001 to make sure that travelers have a secure and comfortable travel. Today TSA employs about 50,000 people! So really, there is a benefit to the temporary discomfort we have to endure.

Plan and Prepare:

  • Arrive at the airport well in advance of scheduled flight departure times.
  • Pack in easily inspected modules that can be lifted out individually.
  • Have your ID and boarding pass ready as you approach the checkpoint.
  • Place coins, keys and other metal objects in your carry-on bag.
  • Remove shoes during screening and pass them through the scanners.

TSA Prohibited Items:

  • Sharp Objects (Box Cutters, Knives, Ice Axes/Ice Picks, Meat Cleavers)
  • Sporting Goods (Baseball Bats, Bows and Arrows, Cricket Bats)
  • Guns and Firearms (Flares, Gun Lighters, Gun Powder, Pellet Guns)
  • Tools (Hammers, Crowbars, Axes and Hatchets)
  • Martial Arts and Self Defense Items (Billy Clubs, Black Jacks, Brass Knuckles, Kubatons)
  • Explosive & Flammable Materials, Disabling Chemicals & Other Dangerous Items

Carry-on-Luggage:

  • Travelers may carry liquids in carry-on luggage, but must comply with “3-1-1″ TSA rules.
  • At the checkpoint, travelers are usually asked to take the zip-top bag of liquids out for X-ray.
  • Exceptions: Mothers may carry more than 3 oz of breast milk when unaccompanied by their child; small amounts of required medicines and after clearing security, beverages and other items purchased are permitted on-board the aircraft.
  • Organize carry-on bags with see-through plastic or mesh organizers for TSA inspectors to speed the security process.

Checked Luggage:

  • Loose lithium batteries are not allowed in checked luggage.
  • Lighters and matches are not permitted in checked luggage.
  • Liquids must be in leak-proof containers.
  • Luggage locks must be TSA accepted so baggage screeners can unlock them for inspection.

Please feel free to share one line of your frustration or excitement about your recent travel and opinion about the TSA regulations.

BottleWise is committed to manufacturing high-quality bags that make life easier for the discriminating culinary traveler and is founded by Amy Dias (adias@bottlewise.com)

Incoming search terms:

Traveling with KIDS?

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Family Travel, Packing Liquids, Travel on March 15th, 2012 by – 12 Comments

With spring break upon us and summer vacations quickly approaching, parents are typically more nervous than excited as they prepare for a vacation with their lively kids in tow. As many know, traveling with kids can be stressful. Fear not, we have a few tips to easily prepare parents to think ahead and get organized for their vacation.  This will transform your vacation with kids into an “expedition of amusement” rather than a bitter experience.

Here are a few things to have prepared when traveling with kids:

1) A detailed agenda and tour plan of the places you are planning to visit.
2) Copies of all schedules and time lines to various places to cover.
3) Kids should be actively involved in certain activities such as:

  • Putting together your trip ideas
  • Planning out activities to do on vacation
  • Making family rules during vacation
  • Having a small rewards and penalties if the rule was broken
  • Assigning roles based on age group such as food carrier, water carrier, photographer, etc.
  • Collecting memorable items like tickets, brochures, pictures, etc.

4) Family games, cards, checkers,art supplies.  Many games come in travel form which are perfect for planes, trains and cars.

5) Electronic devices for kids(big and small) like cameras, laptops, DVD players, hand held games.  Don’t forget extra batteries and chargers.  Taking a GPS along is perfect for exploring your new destination and finding points of interests.

6)  Have a supply of healthy snacks on hand.  Don’t count of the airlines for much more than a drink and a bag of pretzels.
7) Packing your baggage:

  • Limit check in luggage. Try to have carry on luggage and have backpacks for each kid and allow them to carry their own stuff. This will save you money and time.
  • Pack light clothes, sweaters, jackets, beach wears, shoes.  The more items each individual can wear, the easier it is to pack and keep items to a minimum.  Ideally your destination has laundry facilities to do a quick load if necessary.
  • Follow TSA’s 311 rules when are packing the liquids, gels, toothpaste, shampoo and other stuff for your kids. These are all important for your kids, but at the same time are restricted to carry on the planes in great volumes.

Packing the family’s items can sometimes be quite a challenge, one parent commented, “Nowadays opening my baggage after a trip can be full of surprises. I only wish that I don’t end up having a toothpaste stained shirt and shampoo covered pants.” A few great products that will come in handy when packing toiletries are Pitotubes and GoToobs. Often packing many of our daily necessities slips our mind and it is often a pain to carry full size products, make sure you have the TravelRite travel kit, which will make your life so much simpler. All of these items meet TSA 3-1-1 regulations so you can use them in your carry-on luggage.  Shop www.BottleWise.com.

Pitotubes Quart Size

Family vacations can be fun, enjoyable, memorable, cherishing and adventurous. Don’t let the detail of packing and planning ruin a family memory.  It  pays to plan ahead.  Have some planning trips that have worked for you and your family in the past, we would love to hear them!

BottleWise is committed to manufacturing high-quality bags that make life easier for the discriminating culinary traveler and is founded by Amy Dias (adias@bottlewise.com)

Incoming search terms:

Carry-Ons: Right vs. Wrong

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Liquids, Travel, TSA Regulations on February 7th, 2012 by – Be the first to comment

Sue Ellen: average height, slender build, simply dressed, frazzled mind, and bloodshot eyes. She’s a smart woman, but let’s face it, she’s been working hard. It’s 11:30 PM and Sue Ellen has yet to pack for her trip to New York City tomorrow at 5:00 AM.

So what results? Sue Ellen grabs an energy shot and begins a whirl of activity. She dumps in three pairs of slacks, a skirt, four blouses, a scarf, three blazers, a jewelry box and her mismatched, dirtied, TSA approved zip-lock bag into an over sized duffel bag. On top of that she throws in her two pairs of bulky high-heeled shoes. Of course, her laptop fits in there….somewhere. Finally the miscellaneous items: a snack bar, her iPod, headphones, portfolios and a few pens. All in all, her bag is a dump yard.

Alright, so we already have a bad feeling about this scenario. Let’s fast-forward and see how it pans out. A tired, sleepy Sue Ellen arrives at the airport and hurries through check-in. She lugs her duffel bag through security but is stopped. Her bag has to go through another security check. The attendant dumps out all her bag’s contents. The zip-lock bag has opened and ruined her good slacks and shoes. Her nice blouses are wrinkled. The security attendant discards her zip-lock and allows her to proceed. Not only do the few minutes cause Sue Ellen to miss her flight, but she has no toiletries and soiled clothing. What a great start to her business trip!

Now if we back track, we can see that the crucial point was Sue Ellen’s hurried packing job. Could she have done things differently? Yes, perhaps she could have. Here are few tips that may have helped her out to pack her carry-on bag:

  • Pack in layers and be organized. Rolling clothing helps reduce wrinkles and saves space.
  • Don’t over-pack clothes and shoes.  Many outfits can be mixed and matched over a few days.
  • Invest in one piece of carry on luggage that is easy to pack and fits nicely in the crowded overhead bins.
  • Pack a second carry-on (backpack, handbag or computer case) with your laptop or electronics you need access to easily on your flight.
  • Pack items that need to be removed in security (toiletries, computer, etc) in one carry-on. This avoid having to rustle through both of your approved carry-on pieces.
  • Use travel-size bottles for cream and liquids that aren’t bigger than 3 oz.
  • All liquids should fit into a quart sized, transparent plastic bag
  • Declare or discard any liquids that you have (baby formula, juice, medications, bottled water, etc.)before getting into line.  You are not only going to delay yourself, but others behind you.

Most of the above is pretty simple. The only challenge is getting those liquids under control. Who wants to be running around the last minute, tearing the house apart for small containers to put shampoo in? After all that hard work, you won’t even be sure that those liquids won’t leak! As cabin pressure changes, often liquids are caused to leak out of containers. Who wants to deal with that?

This is why BottleWise offers travelers  few alternatives to help make packing your toiletries at various price points. TravelRite Kit comes with TSA approved bottles with tops and a see-through plastic bag. If you’re more of the simple type or just new a few leakproof bottles, Go Toobs are for you. If the cabin pressure has been messing with your plastic bottles, then a great thing to do is check out Pitotubes; they don’t let those liquids leak!

Be sure to check out our great savings on all of our toiletry items to make your next trip mess free!  Safe Travels.

Incoming search terms:

Security Checkpoint – A Pit Stop in your journey

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Liquids, Travel, TSA Regulations, TSA Restricted Items on January 30th, 2012 by – 1 Comment

Imagine this…you’re planning a trip from your home in the city of Chicago to Washington DC, which would be roughly a two hour journey by flight. But, you’ve got to keep in mind that the security checks prior to the journey will waste two whole hours of your valuable time. No matter frequent of a traveler, there’s no way around the TSA (Transportation Security Administration) rules. You still have to stand in long lines and disrobe yourself multiple times. Doesn’t that become a pain? Of course, but proper planning always helps. Especially in travel nowadays, it really makes much more sense to plan with the increasing rules from the TSA. Let’s see what the travelers have on their mind about the security check…

Can I carry my favorite shampoo and toothpaste?
You can carry limited amounts (3 oz. gel or liquid) in your carry-on. Good news! There are several great products on the market that make packing your favorite shampoos, creams and makeup a breeze.  GoToobs are a compact, reusable and inexpensive solution.

I need my prescription medication and how about food for my baby?
Thank goodness, they are exempt from the rules. However to expedite the process place these items in their original labeled containers.

I’m a photographer, is it safe to have my film rolls in carry-on?
X-Ray machines for carry-on are considered safe. It would be better to carry the rolls in clear plastic bag. Depending on the number of security check points during your travel and minimal exposure is better.

What can I expect in passenger screening?
Unlike your baggage, which undergoes X-Ray exposure, you, as a passenger, don’t have to do the same thing. However, it is mandatory to remove your shoes, place your cell phone and any other metal items like keys along to be screened as well.

I am going on a wine tour in the Fall, how can I bring home a few bottles of wine? Unfortunately, with the new TSA regulations, you must pack any liquids over 3 oz in your checked baggage.    There are a few products on the market that make packing large, fragile bottles of liquid a breeze!  The BottleWise Duo easily packs two bottles of wine or spirits in your luggage.  This bag is reusable and lightweight!

Last but not least, it is always better not to argue with the TSA authorities if they confiscate something from you. Argument never makes the situation better, especially with the security authorities. If they feel that your nail clippers might be a potential danger, just say, “So be it!” and pass the security check. You don’t want to miss your flight with such expensive tickets for something that is worth less than a dollar.

What have you had confiscated by TSA in your journeys recently?

BottleWise is committed to manufacturing high-quality bags that make life easier for the discriminating culinary traveler and is founded by Amy Dias (adias@bottlewise.com)

Incoming search terms:

Holiday travel: Airport survival guide

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Airline Fees, Airline Service Charges, Packing Tips, Travel, Travel Tips, TSA Regulations, TSA Restricted Items on August 12th, 2011 by – Be the first to comment

The crowds. The lines. The security and scanning. The sprint to the gate. All of it can overwhelm air travelers — especially during the holiday rush — but it doesn’t have to be that way.

And as security measures continue to ramp up, with pat-downs and new scans, navigating overbooked, overflowing airports just got a bit more dicey. We asked travel experts to provide tips to make the airport experience a smooth one, especially if you haven’t flown since last holiday season. But first, be aware that you’ll have lots of company in your quest to share a turkey dinner with relatives.

It’s estimated that 42.2 million people will travel at least 50 miles from home for Thanksgiving, according to AAA and IHS Global Insight. That’s an 11 percent increase from last year, when 37.9 million people traveled during the holiday. And about 24 million people will be crammed into airplanes, a 3.5 percent increase over last year, according to the Air Transport Association of America, which represents somHoliday Travele of the nation’s biggest airlines.

The busiest travel day is expected to be the Sunday after Thanksgiving, followed by the Monday after the holiday, the ATA said. The Friday before Thanksgiving week and the Wednesday before the holiday will be the other peak travel days.

The least busy travel day? The holiday itself: Thursday, November 25.

No matter what day you fly, here are five tips to survive the airport this holiday season.

1. Hit the web before you head for the airport

Let modern technology save you some hassles and maybe even some money. Check in online up to 24 hours before your flight is scheduled to leave, and print your boarding pass at home.

“This allows you to secure your seat assignment, double-check for any schedule changes … and decrease your chances of getting bumped if your flight is oversold,” said Genevieve Shaw Brown, senior editor at Travelocity.

New since the holidays last year: More carriers now allow you to check in from your smartphone and use a digital bar code on the screen to pass through the airport. If you’re using this option, save the bar code as a photo on your device, which will make it much easier to retrieve at security and at the gate, advised Bryan Saltzburg, general manager of TripAdvisor Flights.

If you’re checking bags, many airlines have raised their fees this year, but some offer discounts if you prepay during the online check-in. Delta, Continental and US Airways, for example, take $2 off the first bag and $3 off the second if you pay online when you check in for your flight on the carrier’s website.

“Know before you go,” Saltzburg said. “There are fees, and it’s important to educate yourself and be prepared and handle as much of the check-in process before you actually get to the airport.” He recommended the ultimate airline fee guide on SmarterTravel.com to get a clear picture of any extra charges you might pay.

2. Pack light

Avoid checked-bag fees altogether by bringing carry-on luggage only. (Be sure to check with your carrier on the maximum size of bags allowed in the overhead bins.) You can head straight for the security line when you arrive at the airport and skip the baggage carousel after your flight lands at your destination.

New since the holidays last year: Spirit Airlines now charges a fee for carry-ons that passengers place in the overhead bins. (Each traveler can still bring one personal item that fits under a seat for free, such as a purse or briefcase.) Every other airline allows one piece of luggage and one personal item to be carried on for free by every ticketed passenger, Brown said.

3. Give yourself plenty of time

TripAdvisor recommends getting to the airport at least two hours before your scheduled departure for a domestic flight and three hours before an international trip, Saltzburg said. It’s especially important to get to the airport early during the Thanksgiving and Christmas travel rush, because the many inexperienced fliers and families with children who are venturing out during the holidays will probably slow down the security process.

New since the holidays last year: Beefed-up screening means that lines may be moving more sluggishly. “Body scanners and additional pat-downs are the norm these days, leave extra time to get through security,” Brown said.

4. Prepare for the security line

There’s no avoiding your encounter with Transportation Security Administration agents, and there’s tension in the air as hundreds of travelers grab bins and shuffle through with their belongings.

“The one place you’ll tend to have to queue is going to be at airport security, and it’s probably your most stressful part of the trip,” Saltzburg said. You can’t speed up the line, but you can do your part to prevent slowing it down. Here are some basic tips:

  • Have your boarding pass and ID easily available.
  • Remove your shoes. (“Slip-on shoes should make going through security much faster,” Saltzburg advised.)
  • Make sure all of your liquids are in a zip-top plastic bag that’s kept separate from your carry-on bag and adheres to the 3-1-1 rule: Fliers are limited to 3-ounce or smaller containers of liquids or gels, that can fit in a one-quart-size clear plastic zip-top bag; one bag per passenger.
  • Send coats and jackets through the X-ray machine.
  • Take any items that might set off the metal detector — like keys, loose change and heavy jewelry — out of your pockets.
  • Don’t wrap any gifts. If security officers need to inspect a package, they may have to unwrap it. If traveling with food, check the TSA’s list of items that should be checked or shipped ahead.

5. Plan for flight delays

Don’t expect all of your Thanksgiving travel plans to happen without a hitch, Orbitz.com advised. Prepare for the worst, hope for the best, and if you have connecting flights, build buffers into your itinerary so that one disruption won’t jeopardize your entire trip. “Keep any medication you need and something to keep you busy in your carry-on bags,” Brown said.

Saltzburg, who flies several times a week, said he depends on noise-canceling headphones to provide him with moments of Zen. “I put my headset on, and it tunes out the world around me,” he said.

Safe Travels.

This article was written by A. Pawlowski, CNN

Incoming search terms:

Why Is the TSA Questioning Me?

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Tips, Travel Tips, TSA Regulations, TSA Restricted Items on December 20th, 2010 by – Be the first to comment

Did you know that something as simple as a headband can trigger airport alarms? Here, seven ways you may unknowingly set off security measures—and what to do about it.

Ever wonder why the TSA singled you out to rifle through your bag? Or what exactly made the metal detector beep? By now, we all know to ditch our liquids before reaching security. But did you know that something as harmless as a headband can prompt a time-consuming cross-examination?

On an average day, transportation security officers scan more than 2 million travelers—and all of their luggage—and that number will only continue to increase. We spoke to TSA spokeswoman Lauren Gaches for the lowdown on seven items that can put officers on alert in spite of the fact that, for the most part, they’re perfectly acceptable for air travel.

THE OFFENDER: ALUMINUM FOIL WRAPPERS

Why they catch attention: Nothing escapes the metal-detecting prowess of airport security systems—not even something as minuscule as a foil wrapper. Many manufacturers of chewing gum, candy, and cigarettes have caught on and made the transition from metallic wrap to paper, but the hold-outs can put a kink in your smooth passage through airport checkpoints. What to do: Empty your pockets of any and all offending foil before passing through a metal detector.

THE OFFENDER: HEADBANDS

Why they catch attention: Even though headbands (like bulky clothing and hats) are not prohibited, sporting them may lead to additional screening. The reason is simple: Metal constitutes the frame of many headbands and, consequently, triggers the detector. What to do: Avoid being pulled aside by sending your hair accessory through security ahead of you on the X-ray belt.

THE OFFENDER: SMALL ALCOHOL BOTTLES

Why they catch attention: The TSA is naturally more focused on detecting potential explosives than in analyzing the contents of your personal minibar, but when it comes to liquors, the rules are based on size and packaging: Respectively, alcohol must be less than 3.4 ounces, bottled in original container, and contained in a one-quart sized, zip-top bag. What to do: As long as you follow the 3-1-1 requirements for liquids, you should be ok.

THE OFFENDER: SNOW GLOBES

Why they catch attention: Don’t expect to get onto a plane with a snow globe. Believe it or not, the liquid contents of most crystal balls surpass the 3.4-ounce limit and, consequently, aren’t allowed in carry-ons. In fact, back in October an abandoned package containing a snow globe appeared so suspicious that it caused the evacuation of Bradley International Airport in Connecticut. What to do: There’s no way around it—snow globes need to be checked.

THE OFFENDER: INHALERS

Why they catch attention: As an aerosol product, some inhalers are a cause for concern because at first glance they may seem to violate the “3-1-1″ rule for liquids, gels, and aerosols (limit of 3.4 ounces, packed in one quart-size, see-through, zip-top bag). Of course, given that these objects are a medical must for some travelers, they are exempt from restriction. What to do: To avoid unwanted questioning, Gaches advises travelers to inform officers in advance if they’re carrying an inhaler. It helps speed things up if your medications are properly labeled.

THE OFFENDER: UNDER-WIRE BRAS

Why they catch attention: The TSA swears this shouldn’t be an issue, but we’ve heard plenty of tales from women (and at least one cross-dresser) who insist that the metal in an under-wire bra has triggered a secondary “wanding” after passing through the metal detector. In some cases, a rogue under-wire has even led to a closer inspection by a female agent in a private room. What to do: The answer, then, may be to pack the metallic lingerie in your checked bags and sport a more comfortable model while in flight.

THE OFFENDER: JARS OF PEANUT BUTTER

Why they catch attention: Everything on earth can be categorized as a liquid, gas, or solid—except maybe lava and peanut butter. It’s doubtful you’ll be packing lava in your purse, but what about peanut butter? It’s certainly not a liquid—you could hold it upside down for a decade and it would never drop. But anything that can “conform to the shape of its container,” such as cold cream, toothpaste, or, yes, peanut butter, can upset the swift flow of the security line. What to do: Plan ahead and pack “conformable” liquids in the bags you’ll be checking. Peanut butter sandwiches, on the other hand, are perfectly fine.

Unsure about an item that’s not on our list? Check out the TSA’s online “Can I Bring?” application to see what is (and is not) acceptable.

By Gary McKechnie, Budget Travel

Incoming search terms:

BottleWise Launches Rollup: Must Have Wine Bag for The Gourmet Traveler!

Posted in 3-1-1 Liquids Bans, Packing Liquids, Travel, TSA Regulations, Wine Gadgets on October 25th, 2010 by – 1 Comment

Madison, WI – Oct. 25,  2010 – BottleWise®,  creator of innovative travel gear for food and wine enthusiasts, today announced the availability of BottleWise Rollup™, a compact wine travel bag that safely transports up to 1 L bottle inside checked luggage. Rollup, the latest addition to the BottleWise lineup, offers a new class of lightweight, yet durable protection for your best bottles. Think beyond the vino-this bag isn’t just for wine.

Rollup Features

Designed with the sophisticated culinary traveler in mind, BottleWise Rollup features a padded, insulated sleeve, plus one interior liquid-tight liner to protect your bottle from breakage. The versatile wine travel case allows foodies to safely transport a variety of gourmet liquids and is reusable, so it’s environmentally friendly.  When not in use, Rollup simply lays flat; when needed, just roll that bottle up for safe travels!  No breaks. No leaks. No worries.

TSA Friendly

Developed in response to the U.S. Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) restrictions on liquids in carry-on bags, the BottleWise Rollup is so much more than a wine bottle carrier. Travelers can once again, safely bring home that special bottle of wine, spirits, olive oil and more from their culinary adventure. Baggage handlers are no match for the durability of BottleWise products-you can rest assured your best bottles will arrive safely intact!

Rollup Pricing and Availability

Pricing for BottleWise Rollup is $19.99. It’s made in the USA of durable, yet lightweight fabric and comes with a lifetime guarantee. Rollup comes in a variety of colors: Onyx, Bordeaux, Vine and Azure. The multi-purpose wine bottle bag is available just in time for the holidays.

Rollup your best bottle and go!

Rollup your best bottle and Go!

About BottleWise

Since it’s inception in 2007, BottleWise has become the trusted name in gourmet travel gear, specializing in bottle protection for your liquid lifestyle™. Whether you like wine or whiskey, champagne or a micro brew; we’ve got you covered!  We’ve sold thousands of our wine totes worldwide, and haven’t lost a bottle yet. BottleWise has received rave reviews by travel enthusiasts, and has been featured in numerous media outlets, including; Wine Spectator, NBC Weekend New York, The Wall Street Journal, United Hemispheres, CruiseReport.com, DailyCandy.com and Real Simple to name a few. When your best bottles matter, BottleWise is the only choice.   Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.  Visit us online at www.bottlewise.com.

Incoming search terms: